All posts by wrts buffalo

New gyms in Clarence, Derby cater to all kids – including those with special needs – Buffalo News

Jessica and Jeffrey Sills have walked similar paths since their days as high school sweethearts.

They graduated together from Lake Shore High School, married and blazed careers working with children – Jeffrey as a physical education teacher at John T. Waugh Elementary School, Jessica as a speech-language pathologist who provided home visits for Erie 2 BOCES and the Lake Shore school district.

The Derby couple, both 33, became vegans together, had two daughters – Camila, 4, and Olivia, 3 – then turned their attention toward what they’d discovered on the job was a community need: a gym for all kids, regardless of their needs.

Read more here

Featured Video Play Icon

Kids Gym Helps Community in Multiple Ways – WKBW Buffalo

A gym in Evans has become hugely successful because of its unique perspective.

We Rock the Spectrum Kids Gym is designed to help children with autism and other sensory processing disorders. It has also become a part of the community in other ways. We Rock the Spectrum Kids Gym has partnered up with Lake Shore High School’s work-skills program to help students practice skills they will need after leaving school. The students work on everything from communicating with customers to organizing paperwork to cleaning.

Watch Full Video

Gym opens to help kids with autism, sensory processing disorders

DERBY, N.Y. (WIVB) – A new gym is opening in the southtowns to help kids with sensory processing disorders like autism grow and learn. For two and a half year-old Odin Green, finding places for him to play can be a struggle. So his mom, Elida, drove two hours to bring him and his sister to the “We Rock The Spectrum” kids gym in Derby. Continue reading Gym opens to help kids with autism, sensory processing disorders

My Brother Rocks The Spectrum Foundation

My Brother Rocks The Spectrum Foundation is our 501(c)3 (tax id #46-4393642) non-profit organization that helps families receive the funding they need to participate in our social skills/activity groups, classes, camps and more. This allows children to be able to use the specialized sensory swings and activities WRTS offers. We offer these groups to children and young adults from 2 to 18yrs of age.

Our mission is to provide all children with any ability or disability a place they can build friendships, keep active and learn to use their energy in their bodies in a productive environment. WRTS uses its equipment and activities to integrate children in this environment also through their Open Play. We also receive funding from other state programs like the Regional Center, that provide one to one attendant care and other specialized services required to ensure all children can find the benefits of healthy play.

All funds donated to MBRTS are distributed to all of the WRTS locations Nationwide to complete our mission of giving families a community and,  “finally a place where you never have to say I’m sorry.”

Visit our website!

ATAK Interactive

ATAK Interactive is a full-service digital house located in Los Angeles. They are a service-first kind of company that works hard to create the right solutions for you and your organization or brand.

They work with organizations and businesses just like yours who do amazing work offline and need some help online. Finding a company that can do everything you need isn’t easy. Finding one that does it right, on time, and puts the same tender, love, and care into your business that you do is even harder. That’s the agency ATAK has chosen to be. That’s the solution you’ve just found.

If you need something designed beautifully, ATAK’s got you covered. If you need something built into your website, ATAK can do that too. If you want your message marketed to the world – ATAK will create it, tell you who to send it to, and figure out the best way to get it there. Visit ATAK Interactive at www.ATAKInteractive.com or call them today at 310.526.7493. You can also email to info@atakinteractive.com.

Cradle Beach

Cradle Beach was founded in 1888 with the sole purpose of serving underprivileged children from the city of Buffalo in a time when diphtheria, cholera infantum and typhoid were major killers of infants and children. The Fresh Air Mission, as it was called then would provide a place where these children could enjoy the sun, water and wind, while having enough to eat. They were brought to the shores of Lake Erie by horse drawn carriage, lived in tents on the hill and were brought to a big farm house for meals. For many years the organization continued to serve children in this capacity. As it began to grow in numbers of children served and in structure, cabins were built for the children to sleep in. Programs were put in place to make their stay an enjoyable one, while still helping the camper to become healthy.

In 1946, after many years of serving only underprivileged children, the summer camp program took its first group of children with special needs, financed by the Buffalo Rotary Club. A new era in the history of the camp had begun. A new philosophy began to take shape, holding true then and now – every child, even the most small and deprived has importance and dignity. The children with special needs were integrated into the program with “well children”. Physical structures were built with these children’s lives in mind. The cabins were at ground level, allowing easy access for those in wheelchairs or using walkers. A tunnel was built for the children to easily cross the street, as the camp was split by Old Lakeshore Road.

As the needs of the children served by Cradle Beach Camp expanded, the need for a larger, more easily accessible camp was realized. In 1996 the camp was moved to its current location. Still located on the shores of Lake Erie, the camp is over 60 acres of beach, woods, nature trails and open space. The camp facilities include 15 cabins, large dining and recreation hall, infirmary, computer lab, library, and an arts and crafts center. All facilities are designed to meet the special needs of our campers. Outdoor facilities include a tennis court, basketball court, baseball field, walking-hiking trails, low ropes course, a universally accessible playground, adaptive challenge course and a swimming pool that is one of very few in the state to be fully accessible to all children…..

Read More!

DDAWNY

The Developmental Disabilities Alliance of Western New York is a collaborative group of member voluntary agencies that provide services to people with developmental disabilities.  While honoring individual agency missions, it is the intent of the Alliance to assist agencies to develop relationships, promote unified strategies and share risks for the mutual gain with and for the benefit of people with developmental disabilities.

See More!

Buffalo Hearing&Speech Center

Hello and welcome to Buffalo Hearing & Speech Center. We offer innovative services to children and adults with communication disorders and specialized education needs. We believe communication is a basic human right, and as such, we offer a variety of communication-based therapies to service Niagara and Erie counties and school-based programs in Chautauqua County.

It brings me joy to see our nearly 350 employees out in the community helping over 11,000 people each year. Please enjoy the time you spend on our website and if we may be of service to you, your family or someone you know, please do not hesitate to call Buffalo Hearing & Speech Center.

Learn More!

Aspire of WNY

Many times, the greatest things start with humble, quiet beginnings. For Aspire of Western New York, a young mother planted the seeds that would soon grow into a legacy of caring, devotion and hope.

Sherwood Moss was born March 25, 1945, to Mr. and Mrs. David Moss. A year-and-a-half later, Sherwood was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. There was little assistance for the Moss family as they lovingly cared for their son. Mrs. Mary Moss was fortunate to have a group of friends in the Junior League of Buffalo – an educational and charitable women’s organization aimed at helping the community and promoting volunteerism – who wanted to help. Mary mobilized friends, family and other parents of children with cerebral palsy to form the Cerebral Palsy Association of Western New York on September 19, 1947.

Working together, the Cerebral Palsy Association and the Junior League began studying the problem of cerebral palsy. After a year and a half of study, an October 9, 1949, article from the Buffalo Courier-Express reported that the organizations had made significant progress in educating the community about cerebral palsy’s meaning and treatment methods, while also lobbying for state legislation. The organizations also realized there was no place in the community for young adults with cerebral palsy to meet together. They decided to establish a recreation program, said to be the first of its kind. Meeting space was donated by the Crippled Children’s Guild at 936 Delaware Avenue.

An article from the September 13, 1949, edition of The Buffalo Evening News vividly described what would be called the Young Adult Cerebral Palsy Center:

For the first time in their lives a group of young men and women are looking forward to a gay winter full of happy, interesting days. Accustomed to watching other boys and girls, these young people now are being offered a brand-new slice of living. They will go out at least one night a week for social recreation—go out wheelchairs and all. These young men and women are handicapped by cerebral palsy. (Statistics show that 95% of cerebral palsy happens at birth—so for nearly every member of this group it’s been a long time!)…..

Read More!